New England Water Science Center

Skip to main content

Water Resources of New England

Welcome to the New England Water Science Center web page. This is your direct link to water-resource information on New England's rivers and streams, groundwater, water quality, and biology. Data collection and interpretive studies are done by the Center to support multi-state water-resource infrastructure and management needs and are part of the USGS science strategy to address the water-resource priorities of the nation and global trends in:

  • Ecosystem status and change
  • Climate variability and change
  • National hazard risk and assessment
  • Environmental risk to human health
  • Water use and availability
  • Transportation activities in relation to water resources

pdf New England Water Science Center Information Sheet

USGS-NEIWPCC Webinar Talks

News Releases

A Decade of Water Science: USGS Helps Assess Water Resources in Afghanistan
Released: 8/19/2014

fact sheet

For the past decade, scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey have shared their expertise with the Afghanistan Geological Survey (AGS) in efforts to build an inventory of Afghanistan’s water resources. A new fact sheet details how these efforts help the country quantify and monitor its water resource.
”This partnership with the Afghanistan Geological Survey and other international agencies is extremely important for Afghanistan,” said Jack Medlin, USGS regional specialist, Asia and Pacific Region. ”There’s a broad consensus that water availability is a global issue, and these collaborative efforts created the data collection networks necessary to help quantify water conditions in the region and manage future water supplies.” Read more ...


Well-Water for 80,000 New Hampshire Residents May contain Metals Exceeding Human Health Standards
Released: 6/16/2014

fact sheet

Nearly three-in-ten well-water samples tested from southeast New Hampshire contained metals at concentrations that exceeded U.S. Environmental Protection Agency drinking-water standards and guidelines, according to a recent U.S. Geological Survey study.
Researchers sampled water from 232 private bedrock wells from 2012 to 2013, testing for levels of arsenic, uranium, manganese, iron and lead.
”Our study showed that a significant percentage of the population that relies on domestic bedrock wells may have drinking water with arsenic, lead, manganese, and (or) uranium concentrations greater than human-health standards established by the EPA for public-water systems,” said hydrologist Sarah Flanagan, lead author of the study. Read more ...

Featured Projects

Water-quality, the controlling factor on the herring run, aquaculture, and blue carbon at the Herring River salt-marsh restoration, Cape Cod National Seashore


video access

The project is a 2015 start of the USGS/NPS Water-Quality Partnership program.
The video shows installing a radar unit to measure tidal flows by the index velocity method in the Herring River project in Wellfleet MA.
The radar unit is provided for testing by Hydrological Services America.



USGS Coastal Storm Surge Monitoring Network


Sensors site locations map interface

Sensors site locations map interface.


Hurricane Sandy made the East Coast of the United States realize its vulnerability to extreme tidal surges, coastal flooding and possible impacts of climate change on sea levels and weather. Following this devastating event, the US Geological Survey (USGS) received $18.8 million in supplemental funding to better understand coastal flooding, to improve our preparedness for future coastal storms, and to increase the resilience of coastal cities, infrastructure and natural systems.
Read more ...

USGS Home Water Climate Change Core Science Ecosystems Energy and Minerals Env. Health Hazards

Accessibility FOIA Privacy Policies and Notices

Take Pride in America logo USA.gov logo U.S. Department of the Interior | U.S. Geological Survey
URL: http://newengland.water.usgs.gov/index.html
Page Contact Information:
Page Last Modified: Thursday, 30-Oct-2014 16:47:34 EDT